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Monday, 09 January 2012
Dim and dimmer

image

According to the “advertisement-rich” Dictionary.Reference.Com website the word Dim has a number of meanings:

adjective, dim-mer, dim-mest

  • not bright; obscure from lack of light or emitted light: a dimroom; a dim flashlight.
  • not seen clearly or in detail; indistinct: a dim object in thedistance.
  • not clear to the mind; vague: a dim idea.
  • not brilliant; dull in luster: a dim color.
  • not clear or distinct to the senses; faint: a dim sound.
  • not seeing clearly: eyes dim with tears.
  • tending to be unfavorable; not likely to happen, succeed, befavorable, etc.: a dim chance of winning.
  • not understanding clearly..
  • rather stupid; dim-witted.
  • verb, dimmed, dim·ming.
verb, dimmed, dim·ming (used with object).
  • to make dim or dimmer.
  • to switch (the headlights of a vehicle) from the high to the low beam.
verb (used without object)
  • to become or grow dim or dimmer.
Verb phrase
  • dim out, (in wartime) to reduce the night illumination of (a city, ship, etc.) to make it less visible from the air or sea, as a protection from enemy aircraft or ships.
Idiom
  • take a dim view of, to regard with disapproval, skepticism, or dismay: Her mother takes a dim view of her choice of friends.

The word comes to Modern English from Old English, which in turn inherited it from the Old Norse dimmr (dark).  According to Edenics the words dim and dumb share a common and ancient root. They highlight that in Russian smoke is dim; in Turkish it is duman.

Note: I took the photograph of the building looming over the lamp post in Dublin last year.

Posted by bigblue on 09/01/2012 at 07:17 AM
Filed under: EuropeIreland • (0) CommentsPermalinkBookmark or Share

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